Classic Moments 

 

The 1877 Dead Heat, lithograph by Charles Robinson 

The 1877 Dead Heat, lithograph by Charles Robinson

1877 the only dead-heat 

Since the race became an annual fixture in 1856 there have been a plethora of close races, classic moments and controversies. 

1877 encapsulated all of these when, at the end of a close race the finishing judge declared a "dead-heat". Though it is reported he actually said, "A dead-heat to Oxford by 5 feet." Read More

1877 the only dead-heat

The 1877 crews

2003, the closest race ever 

Cambridge won the toss and chose Surrey but Oxford took the early lead. At Hammersmith Cambridge crept ahead but Oxford held on around the outside of the Surrey bend, putting in a push past Chiswick Steps to take a narrow lead at Barnes, which they pushed out to 2/3 length. Cambridge pushed once more, hauling the dark blues back but as they approached the finish Oxford just held on to win by 1 foot, the closest ever margin. Read More

2003, the closest race ever

Oxford hold a narrow lead approaching the finish

That sinking feeling 

There have been six sinkings but the race result has only been determined by a sinking on three occasions, 1859, 1925 and 1978. A strong South West wind and a high tide can make for treacherous conditions. This is precisely what affected Cambridge in 1978 who only started to ship water after Hammersmith and managed to stay afloat until they were required to take the centre arch of Barnes Bridge when their fate was sealed. Read More

That sinking feeling

Cambridge begin to sink, 1978